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Ironically enough, if you could take the best of those women and the best of those men, and place them in a big room where they could sit at a table and ask each other questions in person – you’d probably have 4 or 5 new match-ups by the end of the night. All they have to do is get online every day, sitting on their princess throne and file through the dozens or more profiles of men who have messaged them throughout the day.

The problem with online dating is that you can’t see the person’s face when they’re telling you about themselves. I think it’s hard for guys to comprehend the world of online dating from a woman’s perspective. They then flippantly toss out all of those well thought out, carefully crafted messages from most of those poor schmucks, and then they log onto their Facebook accounts to complain to their girlfriends that there are no “good men” left in the world.

The two services used by these individuals were OKCupid and Match.com, two of the largest and most popular dating websites on the Internet.

What I learned from carrying out an interview of a female and the interview of a male trying to dig into this intriguing subject was that using the Internet for dating is equally painful for men and for women, but for very different reasons.

Maggie from New York City specified in her profile that she wanted to meet someone between the ages of twenty-five and thirty-five who lived in Manhattan, so receiving emails from sixty-five-year-old men who lived a hundred miles away was not amusing.

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Sarah Willersdorf is a Partner and Managing Director at the New York office of BCG and the global topic lead for Luxury, Fashion, and Beauty within BCG.

But even before you’ve agreed to meet someone, there may be warning signs of impending dating disaster … Our best online dating advice: before you respond to that next wink or personal message, start watching out for these red flags. A Picture That’s Worth Less Than a Thousand Words It’s normal to be suspicious of people whose pictures are blurry or far away, full of other random people, or purposely vague.

If a guy’s profile is full of shots of him in sunglasses, dressed up for Halloween, or in miniature in front of the Great Wall of China, it’s hard not to suspect that he’s hiding something.

It’s great conversation fodder when someone displays snapshots of himself on vacation or out with friends, but it’s reasonable to expect at least one clear picture of his face.

If you receive an impersonal message that seems oddly like a form letter, it probably is.